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Forbidden Kingdom of Mustang - Himalaya Expedition: The adventure Sports | HimEX NEPAL

forbidden kingdom of mustang

  • 18 days

  • Moderate To Strenous

  • Spring,Autumn

  • people

Mustang is the old kingdom of Lo. Although the actual capital of the Mustang district is Jomsom, the real Tibetan style district lies north of Kagbeni and is usually referred to as Upper Mustang. Mustang has an average elevation of 13,000ft and is located to the north of the mountain giants of Dhaulagiri and Annapurna. Hence, it is north of the main Himalayan range and vegetation-wise belongs to the highlands of Tibet. This vast high valley is arid and dry, therefore, has a barren, desert like appearance. The place is also characterized by eroded canyons, and colorful stratified rock formations. One of the most fascinating features of Mustang is literally thousands of cliff dwellings, some of which look absolutely inaccessible. According to the latest theory, they may date to 8-10,000 BC when Mustang was a much greener land. Naturally, most of the history is now a matter of legend rather than recorded fact. Nonetheless, it seems clear that Lo was once part of Ngari, part of Tibet and a rather loose collection of feudal domains. It was incorporated into the Tibetan Empire under the most famous of the Tibetan kings Songtsengampo. It was an important means of crossing the Himalaya from Tibet to Nepal, and many of the old salt caravans passed through Mustang. By 14C, much of Ngari became part of the Malla Empire, whose capital was Sinja in western Nepal. It had initially become an independent kingdom in its own right under the rule of Ame Pal, the founder king of Lo in 1380. The present royal family can trace its history 25 generations back to Ame Pal, and the city of Lo Manthang, which we will visit, was the centre of their power. In the 1960s, Mustang had become the centre for Tibetan Guerrilla fighters who carried out small operations against the occupying Chinese. They were assisted by the CIA and the Tibetan Khampas were secretly trained in America. After Nixon’s visit to China in the 1970s, the CIA’s support was withdrawn and the Nepalese managed to disband these resistance fighters. Much consideration has been given to the Mustang itinerary we have set and it does not hold back in terms of time spent within the kingdom. The ample time gives you the opportunity to visit the main town, Lo Manthang, and one or two of the villages beyond. Our research indicates that late August /early September would be the best time to visit the kingdom, which is not much affected by the monsoon. World renowned explorers such as British Tibetologist/Professor David Snellgrove and Italian scholar Giuseppe Tucci visited Mustang in the 1950s and it has largely been their tales of a Tibetan-like arid region that has fuelled interest in the area. Realizing the special nature of this old, tiny kingdom, the Nepalese have imposed a surcharge for anyone wishing to trek past Kagbeni, the border of Upper Mustang. With legal trekking groups only being allowed in for the first time in March 1992, visit to this remote outpost of Nepal used to be part of a small privileged minority. Fast forward two decades, it has now made it to the list of must-visit places, for both foreigners and locals alike. Mustang is the old kingdom of Lo. Although the actual capital of the Mustang district is Jomsom, the real Tibetan style district lies north of Kagbeni and is usually referred to as Upper Mustang. Mustang has an average elevation of 13,000ft and is located to the north of the mountain giants of Dhaulagiri and Annapurna. Hence, it is north of the main Himalayan range and vegetation-wise belongs to the highlands of Tibet. This vast high valley is arid and dry, therefore, has a barren, desert like appearance. The place is also characterized by eroded canyons, and colorful stratified rock formations. One of the most fascinating features of Mustang is literally thousands of cliff dwellings, some of which look absolutely inaccessible. According to the latest theory, they may date to 8-10,000 BC when Mustang was a much greener land. Naturally, most of the history is now a matter of legend rather than recorded fact. Nonetheless, it seems clear that Lo was once part of Ngari, part of Tibet and a rather loose collection of feudal domains. It was incorporated into the Tibetan Empire under the most famous of the Tibetan kings Songtsengampo. It was an important means of crossing the Himalaya from Tibet to Nepal, and many of the old salt caravans passed through Mustang. By 14C, much of Ngari became part of the Malla Empire, whose capital was Sinja in western Nepal. It had initially become an independent kingdom in its own right under the rule of Ame Pal, the founder king of Lo in 1380. The present royal family can trace its history 25 generations back to Ame Pal, and the city of Lo Manthang, which we will visit, was the centre of their power. In the 1960s, Mustang had become the centre for Tibetan Guerrilla fighters who carried out small operations against the occupying Chinese. They were assisted by the CIA and the Tibetan Khampas were secretly trained in America. After Nixon’s visit to China in the 1970s, the CIA’s support was withdrawn and the Nepalese managed to disband these resistance fighters. Much consideration has been given to the Mustang itinerary we have set and it does not hold back in terms of time spent within the kingdom. The ample time gives you the opportunity to visit the main town, Lo Manthang, and one or two of the villages beyond. Our research indicates that late August /early September would be the best time to visit the kingdom, which is not much affected by the monsoon. World renowned explorers such as British Tibetologist/Professor David Snellgrove and Italian scholar Giuseppe Tucci visited Mustang in the 1950s and it has largely been their tales of a Tibetan-like arid region that has fuelled interest in the area. Realizing the special nature of this old, tiny kingdom, the Nepalese have imposed a surcharge for anyone wishing to trek past Kagbeni, the border of Upper Mustang. With legal trekking groups only being allowed in for the first time in March 1992, visit to this remote outpost of Nepal used to be part of a small privileged minority. Fast forward two decades, it has now made it to the list of must-visit places, for both foreigners and locals alike.

Itinerary

What's included

Price includes following services:

1. Accommodation sharing twin at Hotel in Kathmandu for 4 nights & Hotel in Pokhara for 1 night on Bed & Breakfast basis.

2. Airport transfers in Kathmandu & Pokhara.

3. Half day guided sightseeing tour of Kathmandu with applicable entrance fees.

4. Internal flight Kathmandu / Pokhara / Jomsom & Jomsom / Pokhara / Kathmandu with applicable airport taxes.

5. Trekking & camping arrangement backed by Sherpa crew on full board basis.

6. Applicable Special Trekking Permit & Conservation Fees.

7. Transfer of staff and equipment to / from Jomsom.

8. Insurance for Nepalese crew.

Not included

Our price does not include followings:

1. International flights to / from Kathmandu.

2. Nepal entry visa fees.

3. Lunch and dinner while in Kathmandu & Pokhara Hotel.

4. Travel, Medical and Personal insurance.

5. Rescue evacuation in case of emergency.

6. Personal clothing and personal trekking gear including sleeping bag & down jacket.

7. Expenses of personal nature, i.e. tipping, laundry, bottled drinks, bar bills etc.

8. Any expense for early returning member due sickness, injury or any other reason. No refund will be entertained for any unused service.

9. Extra expense occurred due to unexpected circumstances like cancellation of internal flights, floods, strike etc.

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